Virtual book tour with Len Filppu

13 responses

  1. Tiffany
    August 20, 2014

    With my clock ticking I really want to have a baby now but my partner thinks he’s too old to start again. He already has two kids from his first wife but I want our own. What can I say or do to convince him?

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      Thank you for your question, Tiffany. I’ve spoken with many men who discovered that being a father for their second round of kids was easier, more fulfilling, and more beneficial for the children because they were more mature, more experienced, had more money and more time, and knew better the ropes of parenthood. Of course, I wouldn’t be a very good author on a virtual book tour if I did not suggest giving your partner a copy of my book. It’ll make him laugh and think about later in life fatherhood, two essentials in the process of convincing himself that it might just be a rich and rewarding experience for all. Good luck, Tiffany.

  2. Robyn
    August 20, 2014

    You said you were afraid that some stranger would think you were the grandfather, not the father. Did that ever happen to you? What did you do? I chose motherhood in my 40’s and sometimes I get those comments myself. I usually stumble out something but I’m looking for a wise – or funny – retort.

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      Yes, Robyn, but it’s only happened twice… in over 14 years. Yet despite its rare occurrence, the irrational fear of it haunted me for several years in my early days of fatherhood. I write about how I overcame this in my book, and essentially it boils down to the self-discovery that I was being an ageist to myself. No one else really cared or thought about my age. It was all inside my own head. I wish I had a witty retort to give you, but I let people know with a smile and sincere statement that I feel blessed to be the father. Thank you for your question, Robyn. Hope this helps.

  3. Stu
    August 20, 2014

    My wife and I are thinking of starting a family but I’m just not sure it’s the right thing at my age. I feel young at heart but my body tells me otherwise – my back hurts, my knees are shot, I pulled my shoulder at the gym. Are my wife and I kidding ourselves?

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      You’ve got most of the battle won, Stu, by being young at heart. I don’t know your age, but I had my first child at age 49, and there are now two, aged 14 and 11. The kids actually keep me young, active, and force me to get in and remain in better shape. I now work out regularly (which I neglected before the kids came), see the doctor, watch my diet, and get up off the sofa to participate in physical activities with them. And since starting gentle yoga about four months ago, my back has not ached. No Grandpa Simpson rocking chair for me, Stu… I’m still trying to rock out with my family.

  4. Donnie
    August 20, 2014

    I found your book to be very entertaining, and informative. Is there another in the works, maybe an update, how a later life Dad copes with teen children? And, are there plans for the original to be developed into a screenplay?

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      Good question, Donnie, thank you. The teen years are revealing a new set of challenges and joys, and we’re really just starting that journey. My kids and family life inspired PRIME TIME DADS, and in similar fashion, I’m in the planning stages of a YA novel, you know, following the flow, grabbing ideas and creative input from the life bursting all around me. I’m so glad you found PTD both entertaining and informative because that’s exactly what I was trying to do for men and women who might be considering later blooming parenthood. And if you know anyone at CAA, let’s take lunch.

  5. Brianna
    August 20, 2014

    Your title says there are 45 good reasons to become a midlife father but if I’m going to make a pitch to my boyfriend, which one or two reasons do you think would have the most impact?

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      Tough question, Brianna, thank you. Here goes. The top reason men should consider fatherhood in midlife is because they can now handle the job. By midlife, men (and women) usually have more money, more job clarity, more patience, more life skills, and more time to spend on activities other than establishing their careers and finding a city and home in which to live. Because of this, they can better handle the priorities of fatherhood. Being dad can then become more fun, a privilege, have deeper meaning, and be more beneficial for the children and mom. Pitch him with the book itself, Brianna… preferably wrapped in fried bacon.

  6. Vicki
    August 20, 2014

    My own parents had me at what was then considered “late-in-life.” My dad was 36 when I was born but out of all the younger fathers on the block, he was the one who took our whole “gang” out to do fun things on the weekends – swimming, ice skating, horseback riding – and did them with us! His age didn’t stop him from teaching me how to do a back dive, hit a tennis ball or do a cartwheel. In his late 70’s he was still doing the limbo. So, you’re right, age doesn’t matter that much if you’ve got the right attitude. Thanks for writing your book!

    • Len Filppu
      August 20, 2014

      Many thanks, Vicki, your comments warm my heart. Your limboing dad certainly knew the dance of midlife fatherhood. The partners are precious, the beat is hot, and you better get up and get dancing because the song just won’t last forever. So glad you shared your memories.

  7. Len Filppu
    August 21, 2014

    I’d like to thank everyone who left comments and questions and everyone who joined us on this Virtual Book Tour. And a special tip of my hat to our hosts, Rosemary and Phyllis, who do such important work and made me feel at home here. I’m told we’ll monitor this tour site for a bit, so please feel free to leave additional commentary, or you can always interact or check in by going to my website at http://www.primetimedads.com/. Happy parenting. –Len Filppu

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